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One of Newfoundland's most unusual accommodation options is set in a restored lighthouse keeper's home on the shores of Iceberg Alley. Located on a deserted island at the most northeasterly point in Newfoundland, Quirpon (pronounced kar-poon) has the longest season in Newfoundland for iceberg viewing. 

Getting here requires a short boat trip and once here there is no TV, no phone signal and no Wi-Fi. As you drift off to sleep in one of the ten well-appointed rooms, the dull reverberation of the powerful North Atlantic surf will accompany you. 

Humpback and minke whales frequent the waters around the island and orca are also regularly seen. A heated, indoor whale-watching station offers a good spot for viewing or you could take an early morning stroll before your hearty breakfast to see icebergs and whales in the sea just outside  the door of the inn. 

Hikes across the island lead to an abandoned fishing village, rugged cliffs, World War II ruins and unexcavated ancient sod huts where the remains of an ancient culture are left undisturbed. Back on the mainland it's only 5km (3 miles) to the Viking site of L'Anse aux Meadows. 

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who's been there
Audley Travel Specialist Richard

Start planning your tailor-made trip by calling one of our Canada specialists on 1 800 817 591

Rooms

The ten rooms are set in the lighthouse keeper's home which dates from the 1920s and the assistant lighthouse keeper's house which dates from the 1960s. All rooms are simple but comfortable with traditional decor and, some have private bathrooms. Wood panels line the walls, patchwork quilts cover the beds and well-thumbed books sit on the shelves. There are no TVs and no Wi-Fi ensuring a stay echoes life in this remote location in times past. 

Location

The inn is located on uninhabited Quirpon Island at the northernmost tip of Newfoundland just 5km (3 miles) from L’Anse Aux Meadows. A regular boat service brings guests to the island or you can choose to kayak from the mainland or be dropped off at the other end of the island and walk the 5km (3 miles) to the lighthouse along a marked trail. The nearest town is St Anthony a 45 minute drive away. 

Food and Drink

All meals are included in a stay and are served communally around the big kitchen table. Food is hearty and traditional with local fish featuring strongly on the menu alongside beef stews and local game. Homemade breads and jams are cooked on site and the beer is made using water harvested from icebergs. A selection of wines is also available as well as hot drinks throughout the day.

Facilities and Activities

A stay at the inn means getting back to basics. There is no TV, no phone and no Wi-Fi and activities focus on the unspoilt nature of the island and the icy waters which surround it. Zodiac tours take guests to see the icebergs floating by, whales are often spotted from the shore and there's a heated, indoor whale-watching station with chairs and binoculars. A series of trails leads around the island and guests can download an app which guides them around the coast to ancient sod houses and World War II remains. 

Our opinion

This is truly one of the most unique places to stay in Canada, and one of the best places to spot icebergs as they drift along Newfoundland's 'Iceberg Alley'.

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    Where possible, we like to offer a range of accommodation for each stop of your trip, chosen by our specialists as some of their favourite places to stay. To help you make the right choice, we give each property a rating based on its facilities and service, but we also look for hotels with distinct character or a location that can’t be bettered.