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Peru travel advice

Peru travel advice

Practical information for travelling to Peru

Practical Information

Peru has an array of ‘must-see’ sights that tend to be visited in a logical route, and at Audley we pride ourselves on being able to offer our clients these classic trips but also something to make your trip a more authentic and personal experience.

During our extensive travels throughout the length and breadth of the country researching hotels and excursions we have discovered some options that will allow you to escape the crowds just for a while, be it a quiet lunch in a hacienda, a homestay or a private Inca Trail walk.

Managing your time in Peru

To make the most of the country, trips to Peru tend to be busy affairs with plenty of early mornings and long days, although we will ensure that you have time to rest, and also time to acclimatise to the altitude.

Internal flights

Internal flights (which tend to be scheduled in the mornings, hence the need for early starts) are used where necessary, but wherever possible we prefer to make use of the spectacular road and rail journeys that link the main towns and sights.

Language

Spanish is the official language, English is spoken in tourist areas. Many indigenous communities in the highlands still have the ancient languages of Quechua and Aymara as their mother tongue.

Food and drink

Seafood is a speciality in the coastal areas, especially the traditional 'ceviche', fish marinated in lemon juice and hot peppers. Highland cuisine is based around corn and potatoes, there are many nutritious and tasty soups and the main delicacy is roasted guinea pig ('cuy'). The most famous drink is pisco, a white grape brandy with a unique taste. Coca tea is made from an infusion of coca leaves and helps to ward of altitude sickness, the most popular soft drink is the national institution of Inca-Kola, a luminous yellow drink that is probably best avoided.

Tipping

Tipping for good service is an accepted fact. Amounts are discretionary.

Money

The Peruvian currency is the new sol. Change is always in short supply. ATM's are available in the major cities and towns. Most machines take all debit cards, as well as Cirrus and Plus cards. Visa and Amex are widely accepted (Mastercard to a lesser degree). If you want to bring traveller's cheques, they should be in US dollars, and not sterling although in general the rate of exchange and commission charges will not be as favourable as that received with cash or cards.

Travel Advice

Our country specialists can advise on any safety concerns you may have. For current information, please refer to the Foreign & Commonwealth Office website.

When to go to Peru

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

* This is a rough guide to when to travel in the country as a whole. It may not necessarily apply to a specific itinerary or part of the country.

  • The best time to travelThe best time to travel
  • A good time to travel, some factors to be aware of A good time to travel, some factors to be aware of
  • Travel is possible, but this is not the best time of year Travel is possible, but this is not the best time of year
  • Snow or ski season Snow or ski season
  • Travel is not recommended Travel is not recommended
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